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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Jul 28, 2012 3:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Frozen Logger question

Back in the day, they did an off the cuff bit of this folk song ( Weavers derived ?) 6 or so times . Who is singing this ? It sounds like Bob and Billy (?)

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Poster: user unknown Date: Jul 28, 2012 3:51pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Frozen Logger

From dead.net:

"The Frozen Logger
Lyrics By: James Stevens
Music By: James Stevens

This was performed a few times by Weir as a novelty or to pass the time while equipment problems were fixed. Weir often only sang one or two verses - eg 26 December 1970, when he sang the first verse and the first two lines of the second verse below. The most complete version I know of (thanks to Matt Schofield for the transcription) is from 6 September 1985, when Weir attempted what might have been the full version but couldn't remember it.`"

There are also references to Grateful Dead performances by Bob and Phil.

The Weavers recorded it in 1951. It was also recorded, among others, by Cisco Houston(1954), Jimmy Rogers(1960) and Odetta(1954 & 1963).


This post was modified by user unknown on 2012-07-28 22:51:41

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Poster: RBNW....new and improved! Date: Jul 28, 2012 3:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Frozen Logger

this is from grateful dead lyric and song finder The Frozen Logger

Lyrics: James Stevens
Music: Ivar Hagland

This was performed a few times by Weir as a novelty or to pass the time while equipment problems were fixed. Weir often only sang one or two verses - eg 26 December 1970, when he sang the first verse and the first two lines of the second verse below. The most complete version I know of (thanks to Matt Schofield for the transcription) is from 6 September 1985, when Weir attempted what might have been the full version but couldn't remember it:

As I sat down one evening, within a small cafe
A forty year old waitress to me these words did say
I see you are a logger, and not just a common bum
'Cause no one but a logger stirs his coffee with his thumb

My lover was a logger, but not like none today
If you'd pour whiskey on him, he'd eat a bale of hay

He came one night to see me, [?] 48 below
[forgets words]

He held her close and kissed her, so hard he broke her jaw
So she could not speak to tell him, he forgot his mackinaw

He went [?] off that evening at 48 below
La, la, la, at 48 below [forgetting words again]
The weather tried to freeze him, it tried it's very best
At 20 degrees below zero he buttoned up his vest

It froze clear down to China, it froze the stars above
At a gazillion degrees below zero, it froze her logger love

So now she works all evening [?] cafe

[at this point Weir gives up and says - "I can't remember the last verse, I'm getting out of here."]

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Jul 28, 2012 4:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Frozen Logger -side note

Odetta's daughter, Michelle Esrick, directed "Saint Misbehavin'"; D.A. Pennebaker is Exec. Producer

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Jul 29, 2012 8:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Frozen Logger

Thanks everyone ! But there are times it sounds like a 2nd voice (non Weir ) is there . The feeling is of a well crocked bar sing along .

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Poster: RBNW....new and improved! Date: Jul 28, 2012 4:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Frozen Logger

i wonder about the discrepancy of who wrote the music?

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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Jul 29, 2012 4:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: The Frozen Logger

This was sung by lumberjacks in the Great Lakes region beginning in the 1880s and 1890s, and it traveled to the West Coast with them after 1900 when the trees in Wisconsin and Minnesota were all harvested and the industry moved to Washington, Oregon, and northern California.

In the 1930s, a Wisconsin folklore professor recorded an elderly logger named Bert Taplin singing it (and other logging songs) as part of the WPA folklore project. Taplin was logging as early as 1885 on the Wisconsin River.

It's probably impossible to determine who wrote it. Like the Paul Bunyan stories, lumberjacks' songs traveled all through the logging regions and everyone who performed them added something new, however they saw fit. By the time it got stabilized on paper or recording tape, its creator was long forgotten.

James Stevens was a one-time logger who collected the Bunyan stories after World War One, rewrote them to be more literary, and published them in 1924. His adulterated versions went on to be a best-seller, and he went on to be a public relations expert for a logging trade association.

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jul 31, 2012 8:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Frozen Logger question

Memory is rusty but I believe the 85 Red Rocks show was sung by Bobby. I think there were tech issues to start the show so Bobby riffed.